Turn everything off

You must have a room, or a certain hour or so a day, where you don’t know what was in the newspapers that morning, you don’t know who your friends are, you don’t know what you owe anybody, you don’t know what anybody owes to you. This is a place where you can simply experience and bring forth what you are and what you might be. This is the place of creative incubation. At first you may find that nothing happens there. But if you have a sacred place and use it, something eventually will happen.

How Disconnection Boosts Your Creativity – Austin Kleon

Phoebe Waller-Bridge

What three words describe your writing process?

Er… panic, panic, hope.

And what is a crucial aspect of your creative process?

Mmm… panic. And hope.

And what would you say to anyone in a creative rut?

Um, read. And walk around. And call someone that you can complain about your rut to.

No training required

I never went to an art school. I failed the art courses that I did take in school. I just looked at a lot of things. And that’s how I learnt about art, by looking at it.

Jean-Michel Basquiat

That’s a relief

This is the beauty and the horror of being a writer — or trying to be anything, really: You can feel important or unimportant. No one cares. No one is watching. You can have fun or you can suffer. No one is grading you. No one is invested. You can proclaim yourself ahead of schedule, or you can spend your whole life telling yourself that you’re running behind. No one is there to measure. You can suspect that you’re insecure and outdated, long-winded and short-sighted, high-strung and lowbrow. Or you can conclude that you’re charismatic, a teensy bit talented, never boring, and reasonably worthy. You have choices. You are the decider. Because the truth is, no one else gives a flying fuck.

I Can’t Stop Comparing Myself To More Successful Writers! – Heather Havrilesky, The Cut.